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MGMT2016 – Business Demographics
Report 1 Instruction – Revised
Report 1 is to be submitted in softcopy only in Week 7. The new deadline of submission of a softcopy to
Turnitin via iLearn is Friday, 24 April 2020, 4:00pm.
Total marks for Report 1: 50 marks. Report 1’s weighting of final grade: 30%
Write a report of approximately 1,500 words on the following topic:
“A Decade (2006-2016) of Population Growth in the State of New South Wales, the Major
Contributing Factors to the Population Growth and the Subsequent Changes in Business
Environments”
Instruction:
It is expected that you will refer to statistics from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), other reliable
data sources and research literature, such as peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, or
authoritative commercial publications. It is expected that you should cite at least 8 different
references. The population trends and key components of population growth in this period should be
discussed and the factors affecting those changes should also be elaborated with supporting
evidence. Finally, the demographic impacts on the business environments in NSW should be
extensively discussed. For example, you could focus on the changing age structure of the population,
changes in international migration intakes, shifting geographic distribution of the population, or
generational changes in consumer behaviours, or changing household composition etc on changes in
business environments in NSW. You should consider using appropriate demographic indicators and
data in the report and apply demographic theories when necessary.
Please follow the Harvard Referencing format (available on iLearn) when citing the sources of your
references. If you are in Law and Psychology disciplines, you could also follow the commonly used
referencing format in your disciplinary areas as long as it is consistent throughout the report. Please
be advised that the penalty for plagiarism could be severe. It is strongly advisable that you strictly
follow an appropriate referencing format and acknowledge all sources of your references.
Report 1 will be assessed by the structure and clarity of the report, application of demographic
concepts and techniques, extensiveness of research and citations of literature, and correct
referencing format.
Report 1 should be typed using Word or other word processing program and submitted in the format
of Word (or an equivalent format).
MKTG2016 – Business Demographics
Report 1 Marking Guide with Rubrics
Marking Guide:
The overall marking guide is based on what is specified in the Report 1 Instruction –
Report 1 “will be assessed by the structure and clarity of the report, application of demographic concepts
and techniques, extensiveness of research and citations of literature, and correct referencing format”.
Total Marks: 50 Marks for Report 1
Marking
Criteria
Structure
43-50 marks
38-42 marks
33-37 marks
26-32 marks
25 marks and less
Report is
exceptionally wellstructured in the
way that it greatly
enhances and
facilitates the
effective
presentation of the
main analyses.
Report is wellstructured in the
way that it
enhances and
facilitates the
presentation of the
main analyses.
Report is clearly
structured and all
main arguments are
presented in an
organised way.
Report is
reasonably
structured and all
main analyses are
presented in a
reasonable way.
Some problems
might be evident.
Report is not well
structured, which
affects the
effectiveness of
the presentation
of the main
analyses.
Clarity
Report presents all
main analyses and
findings with
outstanding clarity.
Report presents all
main analyses and
findings with much
clarity
Report presents all
main analyses and
findings with
reasonable clarity
Reports presents
main analyses and
findings with
reasonable clarity
but some minor
clarity problems
are evident
Report presents
some analyses
and findings,
some major
clarity problems
are evident.
Application of
demographic
concepts/
techniques
Report applies all
demographic
concepts and
techniques
exceptionally well
and correct, and
presented in a
creative way.
Report applies all
demographic
concepts and
techniques well
and correct, and
presented in an
interesting way.
Report applies
some demographic
concepts and
techniques well and
correct.
Report applies
some demographic
concepts and
techniques
reasonably well
and mostly correct.
Some minor
problems are
evident.
Report applies
some
demographic
concepts well but
with considerable
or major
problems in
others.
Extensiveness
of research
and citations
Report presents the
main findings and
analyses based on
exceptionally
extensive research,
evidenced by the
exceptionally wide
range of citations.
Report presents the
main findings and
analyses based on
extensive research,
evidenced by a
wide range of
citations.
Report presents the
main findings and
analyses based on
reasonably
extensive research,
evidenced by a
range of citations.
Report presents
the main findings
and analyses based
on reasonable
research,
evidenced by a
reasonable range
of citations.
Report presents
the main findings
and analyses
based on limited
research,
evidenced by a
few citations
only.
Referencing
format
Report adopts an
exceptionally good
referencing format
with extremely low
similarity index
(lower than 5%).
Report adopts a
good referencing
format with low
similarity index
(lower than 10%).
Report adopts a
reasonably good
referencing format
and with
reasonably low
similarity index
(lower than 20%).
Report adopts a
reasonable
referencing format
with some issues
(e.g. format
consistency and
20% – 40%
similarity index).
Report adopts a
referencing
format with some
considerable
issues and with
higher than 40%
similarity index.
1
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
This student guide presents the most commonly used aspects of the Harvard Referencing
System.
Sources
Snooks & Co 2002, Style manual: for authors, editors and printers, 6th edn, John Wiley &
Sons, Australia.
American Psychological Association 2001, Publication manual of the American Psychological
Association, 5th edn, APA, Washington, DC.
If further information is needed, students can refer to the ‘COMPREHENSIVE
GUIDE: Harvard Referencing System’ or to the above publications in the Macquarie
University Library. Students can also check with their departments or lecturers for
on-campus Harvard referencing support.
Acknowledgement
A significant component of the Master of Accounting (MAcc) program is the Language for
Professional Communication in Accounting Program (LPCA). The LPCA program is a
collaboration of the Master of Accounting program and The Centre for Macquarie English
(CME), formerly the National Centre for English Language Teaching and Research (NCELTR).
The LPCA program provides tailored resources for specific units, as well as providing materials
for additional generic workshops. Students are able to develop a high level of communication
and professional skills and, at the same time, to develop technical skills. These resources are
integrated with relevant technical content and are a significant part of the teaching and
learning within individual units. Communication and professional skills are assessed, often
together with technical skills, in individual units. The development of these skills is essential to
students’ success, not only within the units of this program, but also in an accounting career.
As part of the LPCA program, resources have been made available to provide students with an
understanding of the plagiarism policies of the University and the Master of Accounting
program. Also referencing materials, including this Harvard referencing guide, have been
developed to address the methods and style requirements necessary to cite research sources.
MAcc and CME acknowledge Eugen Klissarov in collaboration with Mary Cayley, both CME-LPCA
staff members, for the design and development of this Harvard referencing guide.
This project was funded by the 2006 Macquarie University Flagship Grant Scheme.
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
CONTENTS
FAQs: referencing & plagiarism
1
Specific guidelines: in-text citations, paraphrases & direct quotations
2
Specific guidelines: reference lists
4
Examples: in-text & reference list citations
7
Sample reference list
14
Excerpts from a paper highlighting in-text citations
15
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
FAQs
REFERENCING
PLAGIARISM
WHAT IS REFERENCING?
WHAT IS PLAGIARISM?
• Referencing is a way of acknowledging or
• Plagiarism occurs when you use another
•
•
•
•
showing the sources of any information that you
have cited or used in any assignments you
present.
In Australia, like in many other countries around
the world, referencing must be used when you
use information from sources in your own work.
At university, information for assignments
usually comes from sources like books, journals
and professional websites.
The assignments are often, for example, essays,
reports and case studies.
Referencing in written assignments has 2
aspects: in-text citations and a reference
list.
WHEN DO I USE IT?
• In-text citations are used within your
assignments whenever you use information
from a source.
• A reference list is usually the last page of your
written assignment and is a list of the sources
you have researched and cited or used in your
assignment.
Generally, you are required to include a
reference list, rather than a bibliography in
your written assignments. You should check
what is required by your department or
lecturer.
It is your responsibility to understand
the different types of plagiarism and how
to avoid them. Plagiarism is a very
serious issue and can lead to severe
penalties, including failing an assignment
or unit. You are strongly advised to
familiarise yourself with the Macquarie
University policy on plagiarism at:
http://www.student.mq.edu.au/plagiarism
WHEN DOES IT OCCUR?
One common type of plagiarism occurs when
you use information such as the words, ideas,
statistics, graphs, charts and arguments of
others and do not acknowledge the sources.
Another common type occurs when students
do not provide the necessary details for intext citations and reference lists.
WHY SHOULD I AVOID IT?
By avoiding plagiarism, you show:
• your understanding of the topic and
requirements of the assignment
WHY SHOULD I USE IT?
• your critical reading, thinking and writing
By using a referencing system, you:
• allow the readers of your work to access your
information sources directly.
• avoid plagiarism.
skills
• your respect for the work of authors you
have researched and cited.
HOW DO I AVOID IT?
HOW DO I USE IT?
• You follow the specific conventions or rules for
using in-text citations and preparing a reference
list.
• This guide is based on the conventions of the
Harvard referencing system.
• There are many different referencing systems
which can be used and each system has its own
conventions.
It is your responsibility to know which
referencing system your department or
lecturer wants you to use.
CME, Macquarie University
Version 2
author’s work without acknowledging or
showing it in your own writing. There are
many different types of plagiarism.
• Plagiarism is often unintentional and can
occur if you have limited understanding or
experience in using a referencing system.
Plagiarism is avoided by:
• understanding the different types of
plagiarism
• recording the necessary details of all your
sources when you use information from
them
• using a referencing system such as the
Harvard referencing system to honestly,
accurately and consistently acknowledge
your sources
• using the skills of summarising,
paraphrasing and quoting when you
prepare your written assignment.
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
1
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
•
When using a referencing system for in-text citations and a reference list, you must use
the appropriate formatting elements.
•
Formatting refers to the use of layout and punctuation, including spacing, indenting, lower
and upper case letters, period or full stops, colons, semicolons, commas, brackets and
italics. These formatting elements are used to clearly and consistently present in-text
citations and a reference list in your written work.
•
The examples throughout this guide indicate the formatting you should use.
IN-TEXT CITATIONS
Each time you use an author’s words or ideas in your writing, you must place a
citation in the text. This applies to both direct quotations and paraphrases. It is
important to place the in-text citation directly in, or immediately after, the sentence or
clause which uses information or ideas from a source. It is not adequate to put the intext citation at the end of the paragraph because this indicates that only the
information in the last sentence belongs to the source.
The basic in-text citation is very similar for all types of sources. However, the type of source
being cited cannot usually be identified until the reader looks at the reference list.
In-text citations in written work may appear either:
a) as part of a sentence
author’s
surname only;
or name of
authoring body
year of
publication
page number/s of the
source from which this
information is taken
[ Jayanthakumaran (2001, p. 6)] states that {Textile, Clothing & Footwear (TCF)
manufacturers have suffered a significant loss of domestic market share since 1993.}
[in-text citation]
{paraphrase}
The use of [ ] and { }, above, are for explanatory purposes only, and should NEVER
be used in written assignments.
In the above example, the author is a grammatical part of the sentence and, in this instance,
appears at the beginning of the sentence.
The above citation can also be placed in different positions in the sentence, for example:
i. According to Jayanthakumaran (2001, p. 6), Textile, Clothing & Footwear (TCF)
manufacturers have suffered a significant loss of domestic market share since 1993.
ii. Textile, Clothing & Footwear (TCF) manufacturers, according to Jayanthakumaran
(2001, p. 6), have suffered a significant loss of domestic market share since 1993.
CME, Macquarie University
Version 2
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
2
b) or at the end of a sentence
i. Textile, Clothing & Footwear (TCF) manufacturers have suffered a significant loss of
domestic market share since 1993 (Jayanthakumaran 2001, p. 6).
These conventions apply to authors and authoring bodies or organizations of all types of
sources.
It is often useful to vary the citation styles, e.g., as part of a sentence or at the end of a
sentence. Varying citation styles may allow for better linking between sentences and
between ideas. It also allows for different emphasis – either on the topic or the author.
Paraphrases
Paraphrases occur when you read a source and use the information in your assignment, but
rephrase or write the information in your own words.
i.
Jayanthakumaran (2001, p. 6) states that Textile, Clothing & Footwear (TCF)
manufacturers have suffered a significant loss of domestic market share since 1993.
This example is a paraphrase and it needs to be cited.
The absence of double quotation marks (“
”) informs the reader this is a paraphrase.
It is expected that you will extensively research and use information found in sources.
However, it is also expected that most of the information from the sources will be
paraphrased, that is, written in your own words.
Direct quotations
Direct quotations are used when you want to use some words exactly as they are found in
the source.
If you rely on a source and use the exact words in your assignment, you must indicate this
by the use of double quotation marks (“ ”). These indicate a direct quotation.
Direct quotations need to be as brief as possible. They should only be used occasionally and
only for good reasons, for example, when:
•
•
•
•
the author’s words convey a powerful meaning that cannot be paraphrased with the same
effect
you use the author as an authoritative voice in your own writing
you introduce an author’s position which you want to discuss
you need to provide supporting points or evidence for your own position.
Generally, direct quotations in the text are placed within your own sentences.
i. Innes and Warburton (1998, p. 69) report that “employment in the TCF sector fell by more
than 40 per cent over the ten years to June 2001”.
ii. As Innes and Warburton (1998, p. 69) report, “employment in the TCF sector fell by more
than 40 per cent over the ten years to June 2001”.
With direct quotations only, page numbers may also be separated and placed at the end of
the direct quotation:
i. Innes and Warburton (1998) report that “employment in the TCF sector fell by more than
40 per cent over the ten years to June 2001” (p. 69).
ii. As Innes and Warburton (1998) report, “employment in the TCF sector fell by more than
40 per cent over the ten years to June 2001” (p. 69).
Page numbers or paragraph numbers should be provided in in-text citations for both
direct quotations and paraphrases.
CME, Macquarie University
Version 2
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
3
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
REFERENCE LISTS
The reference list is usually the last page/s of the assignment. It should begin on a new
page and be simply headed References.
• A reference list consolidates all the various sources in alphabetical order using either the
•
•
•
•
author’s surname or the names of authoring bodies. The titles of documents (or the titles of
media such as videos, CD-ROMs and radio programs) are used if the author’s name or the
name of the authoring body is not known.
Numbers, letters or bullets are not used when citing sources in a Reference List.
The 2nd and subsequent lines of each entry are indented (this is called a ‘hanging indent’).
Single spacing within an entry, but 1.5 spacing between entries is used.
Alignment for the reference list page/s is ‘Align left’. ‘Justify’ should not be used for the
reference list.
Following are the reference list details needed for the more common source types.
Although the details required for each type of source in the reference list are
significantly different, the reference list entries for all source types, both print &
electronic, are based on the entry for a print book, particularly the conventions
relating to multiple authors and authoring bodies.
BOOK, print
• author’s surname & initial(s) or name of authoring body
• year of publication
• title of book (in italics; minimal capitalisation other than proper nouns & acronyms)
• title of series, if applicable
• description of work, if applicable
• edition number, if not first edition
• editor, compiler, reviser or translator, if applicable
• volume number or number of volumes, if applicable
• name of publisher (business identifiers such as company, Pty, Inc., Ltd, Co., Limited,
plc. and Corporation not included)
• place of publication
Reference list:
Moorhead, G & Griffin, R 2001, Organizational behavior: managing people and organizations,
6th edn, Houghton Mifflin, Boston.
Pedersen, H 1937, A concise comparative Lycian grammar, monograph, Vandenhoeck &
Ruprecht, Gottingen, Sweden.
CME, Macquarie University
Version 2
STUDENT GUIDE
Harvard Referencing System
4
CHAPTER IN EDITED BOOK, print
(An edited book is a collection of writings by different authors; the ‘editor’ is the
person who compiles or selects the work to be included).
• author’s surname & initial(s) or name of authoring body (use the author of the chapter/
article you have read, not the editor/s of the book)
• year of publication
• title of chapter/article (single quotation marks; minimal capitalisation other than proper
nouns & acronyms)
the word ‘in’
editor(s)’ initial(s) and surname(s) (initials precede …
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