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Due Sunday by 11:59pm
Points 5
Submitting a file upload
File Types doc, pdf, and docx
Available Apr 20 at 9am – Jun 12 at 11:59pm about 2 months
Before you begin this assignment, please be sure to view course lectures on: Why We Fought;
Legalization of Racism; and Radio and the Experience of War.
Please listen to the “Gas Rationing” episode of Fibber McGee and Molly.
You can find a captioned video of Fibber McGee and Molly
here
This assignment is due by Sunday, April 26 at 11:59 PST.
Please answer the questions listed below. You may structure your response however you choose, as
long as all of the following questions are answered within it. In each response, please include specific
evidence/examples from the episode.
There is no page length for this assignment. Our expectation is that these assignments should be
approximately 1.5-2 pages long. However, there is no penalty if the response does not correspond to
this length.
Questions to be answered:
What is the central lesson or message communicated in this episode? What does the show ask
audiences to learn or to be persuaded of by the end of the episode?
What is the relationship between the episode’s humor/jokes and its central message? In other
words, how does it use humor to communicate its larger point?
What does the episode communicate about gender roles during WWII? How does it communicate
this?
How does Fibber McGee and Molly compare to contemporary sitcoms on TV? In answering this
question please consider at least one of the following questions: how is the humor of the show
similar to or different from contemporary comedies on TV; how is the show’s address
of/incorporation of a contemporary political issue similar or different to how entertainment shows
(especially comedies) address contemporary issues today.
This assignment will be graded according to the following criteria:
1. Does the assignment address all the questions posed?
2. Does the assignment demonstrate a close, careful, and thoughtful interpretation of the primary
source?
3. Does the assignment demonstrate a strong familiarity with course topics and themes?
4. Are all the claims made in the assignment accurate?
5. Does the assignment make sense? Are the ideas within it communicated clearly?
Due Sunday by 11:59pm
Points 5
Submitting a file upload
File Types doc, pdf, and docx
Available Apr 20 at 9am – Jun 12 at 11:59pm about 2 months
Before you begin this assignment, please be sure to view course lectures on: Why We Fought;
Legalization of Racism; and Radio and the Experience of War.
Please listen to the “Gas Rationing” episode of Fibber McGee and Molly.
You can find a captioned video of Fibber McGee and Molly
here
This assignment is due by Sunday, April 26 at 11:59 PST.
Please answer the questions listed below. You may structure your response however you choose, as
long as all of the following questions are answered within it. In each response, please include specific
evidence/examples from the episode.
There is no page length for this assignment. Our expectation is that these assignments should be
approximately 1.5-2 pages long. However, there is no penalty if the response does not correspond to
this length.
Questions to be answered:
What is the central lesson or message communicated in this episode? What does the show ask
audiences to learn or to be persuaded of by the end of the episode?
What is the relationship between the episode’s humor/jokes and its central message? In other
words, how does it use humor to communicate its larger point?
What does the episode communicate about gender roles during WWII? How does it communicate
this?
How does Fibber McGee and Molly compare to contemporary sitcoms on TV? In answering this
question please consider at least one of the following questions: how is the humor of the show
similar to or different from contemporary comedies on TV; how is the show’s address
of/incorporation of a contemporary political issue similar or different to how entertainment shows
(especially comedies) address contemporary issues today.
This assignment will be graded according to the following criteria:
1. Does the assignment address all the questions posed?
2. Does the assignment demonstrate a close, careful, and thoughtful interpretation of the primary
source?
3. Does the assignment demonstrate a strong familiarity with course topics and themes?
4. Are all the claims made in the assignment accurate?
5. Does the assignment make sense? Are the ideas within it communicated clearly?
THE LEGALIZATION OF RACISM:
INTERNMENT DURING WWII
Part I: No-No Boy and Beyond Loyalty
Issei
PEOPLE OF
JAPANESE
DESCENT IN US
Nisei
Kibei
BEYOND LOYALTY
• FBI agent
• Friends/farm manager
• Questionnaire
• family
THE LEGALIZATION OF RACISM:
INTERNMENT DURING WWII
Part II: War and the Homefront
• Office of War Information (OWI)
• How to support war effort
• Use of posters
• Rationing
• Recycling
• Planting victory garden, canning
OFFICE OF WAR INFORMATION
CULTURE
INDUSTRIES
AND WAR
• Entertainment and “hearts and
minds”
• Support war/define war
• Presentation of allies
• Depiction of Germans
• Depiction of Japanese
COMICS AND THE
WAR
• Patriotism and comics
• Images of Japanese in comics
THE LEGALIZATION OF RACISM:
INTERNMENT DURING WWII
Part III: Japanese Internment
POST-PEARL
HARBOR
• Curfew
• Executive Order 9066
• Public Law 503
• War Relocation Authority
• Voluntary relocation
• Forced relocation
R E LO C AT I O N
• Assembly Centers
• Relocation Camps
CONDITIONS
IN RELOCATION
CENTERS
• Harsh climates
• Scarce medical care
• Lack of privacy
• Armed guards, barbed wire
• Restrictions on movement
MANZANAR
(FROM GUARD
TOWER)
MANZANAR
(WINTER
STORM)
MANZANAR
(WINTER)
MANZANAR
(CATHOLIC
CHURCH)
MANZANAR (MESS
LINE)
MANZANAR
(MEAL TIME)
MANZANAR
(POTATO
FIELDS)
MANZANAR
(SCIENCE
LECTURE)
MANZANAR
(BASEBALL GAME)
MILITARY
• Reclassification of Japanese
Americans as IV-C
• Recruitment of linguists
• Reinstitute draft for JapaneseAmericans
LOYALTY TESTS
• Screening to determine loyalty
• Disloyal sent to special camps
• Loyal released on conditions
THE LEGALIZATION OF RACISM:
INTERNMENT DURING WWII
Part IV: Responses to Internment
RESPONSES TO
INTERNMENT
• Newspapers
• ACLU
• Groups that protest: Socialist
Workers Party; Quakers
HIRAB AYASHI V UNITED STATES
• Gordon Hirabayashi
• Question: curfew and power of national government during
time of war?
• Court: during war “residents having ethnic affiliations with
an invading enemy may be a greater source of danger than
those of different ancestry”
• Japanese and Americanism
KOREMATSU V UNITED STATES
• Fred Korematsu
• Actions to evacuate = constitutional
• Wartime conditions and hardships
• Dissenting views
• Justice Murphy: “accumulation of much of the misinformation,
half-truths and insinuations that for years have been directed
against Japanese Americans by people with racial and economic
prejudices”
• Justice Murphy: “I dissent, therefore, from this legalization of
racism”
THE LEGALIZATION OF RACISM:
INTERNMENT DURING WWII
Part V: Conclusions
JAPANESE
INTERNMENT:
REPARATIONS
• Congressional commission
• Formal apology
• Compensation to survivors
OVERTURNING
KOREMATSU
• “Korematsu was gravely wrong the day it
was decided, has been overruled in the
court of history, and — to be clear — ‘has
no place in law under the Constitution'”
RADIO AND EXPERIENCE OF WAR
Part I: Listening In
DEVELOPMENT
OF RADIO
• 1920: origins of broadcasting
• Rise of networks
• Rise of commercial advertising
• Radio programming: dramatic
programming, variety shows,
news, music, religious
programming, sports
RADIO AND THE DEPRESSION
• Roosevelt and radio
• Radio success during Depression
• Radio and entertainment
LISTENING IN
TO RADIO
• Radio and overcoming visual
cues
• Radio and import of speech
• Words
• voices
• Radio and import of sound
• Noises
• effects
• Transcodifiction
R A D I O A N D US
CULT UR E
• Radio and home
• Radio and boundary crossing
• Radio and simultaneity of
experience
RADIO AND EXPERIENCE OF WAR
Part II: Radio and News
RADIO AND WAR
RADIO AND
WORLD WAR II
• Radio and news
• Radio and entertainment
• Radio and propaganda
RADIO AND
NEWS
• European correspondents
• Affordances of radio news
RADIO AND EXPERIENCE OF WAR
Part III: Radio and Entertainment
BROADC ASTING AND THE WAR
• Office of War Information and Radio
• This is War!
• Entertainment and the war
• Soap operas
• Comedies
• Variety shows
FIBBER MCGEE AND MOLLY
• Premieres 1935
• Jim and Marian Jordan
• Gasoline rationing during WWII
• Save rubber
• A, B, C stickers
• Local rationing boards
JACK BENNY
SHOW
• Live variety show
• Format of show
• Innovations of show
• Show and WWII
RADIO AND
WAR
• Soap operas and the war
• Stella Dallas
• Womanpower campaign
RADIO AND EXPERIENCE OF WAR
Part IV: Radio and Propaganda
RADIO AND
WWII
• Radio and citizenship
• Radio and propaganda
• Axis Sally
• Tokyo Rose
RADIO AND EXPERIENCE OF WAR
Part V: Conclusions
WHY WE FIGHT
US and World War II
WHY WE FIGHT
• Brief context
• Brief introduction to Why We
Fight
US ISOLATIONISM
• 1928: Kellogg-Briand Pact
• 1935-36: neutrality legislation
WAR IN EUROPE
• Axis powers, militarism, expansionism
• Opposition to war
• pacifists
• progressives
• conservatives
• Great Debate, support for UK
• internationalists
• isolationists
ENDING US
NEUTRALITY
• Sell arms
• Peacetime draft
• Naval destroyers
• Lend-Lease
ROAD TO PEARL
HARBOR
• Response to Japanese invasion
of China
• Credit to China
• Restrict exports to Japan
• Ban sale of fuel, scrap iron
• Freeze Japanese assets in US
• Pearl Harbor (12/7/41)
• Destroy much of US fleet
• 19 ships sunk/damaged
• 2200 Americans killed
WHY WE FIGHT
• Frank Capra, Gen. George C.
Marshall
• Goal of films
• Aesthetics of films
• How does the film contrast the US to
the Axis powers?
• What, according to the film, is the US
and its allies fighting for? Fighting
against?
AS YOU
WATCH:
• What role do children play in the film?
• What role does animation play in the
film?
• Why, according to the film, do we
fight?
Due Sunday by 11:59pm
Points 5
Submitting a file upload
File Types doc, pdf, and docx
Available Apr 20 at 9am – Jun 12 at 11:59pm about 2 months
Before you begin this assignment, please be sure to view course lectures on: Why We Fought;
Legalization of Racism; and Radio and the Experience of War.
Please listen to the “Gas Rationing” episode of Fibber McGee and Molly.
You can find a captioned video of Fibber McGee and Molly
here
This assignment is due by Sunday, April 26 at 11:59 PST.
Please answer the questions listed below. You may structure your response however you choose, as
long as all of the following questions are answered within it. In each response, please include specific
evidence/examples from the episode.
There is no page length for this assignment. Our expectation is that these assignments should be
approximately 1.5-2 pages long. However, there is no penalty if the response does not correspond to
this length.
Questions to be answered:
What is the central lesson or message communicated in this episode? What does the show ask
audiences to learn or to be persuaded of by the end of the episode?
What is the relationship between the episode’s humor/jokes and its central message? In other
words, how does it use humor to communicate its larger point?
What does the episode communicate about gender roles during WWII? How does it communicate
this?
How does Fibber McGee and Molly compare to contemporary sitcoms on TV? In answering this
question please consider at least one of the following questions: how is the humor of the show
similar to or different from contemporary comedies on TV; how is the show’s address
of/incorporation of a contemporary political issue similar or different to how entertainment shows
(especially comedies) address contemporary issues today.
This assignment will be graded according to the following criteria:
1. Does the assignment address all the questions posed?
2. Does the assignment demonstrate a close, careful, and thoughtful interpretation of the primary
source?
3. Does the assignment demonstrate a strong familiarity with course topics and themes?
4. Are all the claims made in the assignment accurate?
5. Does the assignment make sense? Are the ideas within it communicated clearly?
WWII
US Isolationism
*the desire not to get involved in foreign conflicts
1928: Kellogg-Briand Pact
-After WW1, there were many people who were very cautious about
getting involved in conflicts overseas.
-Congress passed a series of laws in the late 20s and the 1930s.
-International agreement not to use war to resolve conflicts
1935-36:neurality legislation
– c? ongress prevents the U.S from extending loans to nations involved in
conflicts
War in Europe
-Axis powers, militarism, expansionism
Germany began to inviolate ww1 peace settlement
-Opposition to war
? pacifists
All wars are immoral
? progressives
centralization in government power in WWI, shouldn’t get into
wars.
? conservatives
who are sympathetic to the anti-communism of fascist states and
they share Hitler’s anti semitism.
-Great Debate, support for UK(1941)
Internationalists
Believe that the security of the US depends on defeat Germany
Only give sufficient aid to the UK and its allies, no the US involvement
Isolationists
None of the business of US
Lose neutrality if provides aid
Ending US neutrality
Sell arms
-congress lift its ban on selling armaments and allows the US to sell arms
to belligerents who pay cash and use their own ship to transport.
Peacetime draft
-the US was not at war
-require men of military age to register the draft
Naval destroyers
-provide naval destroy to the UK
-build 8 naval bases in the UK
Lend-Lease
-loan supplies to UK
Road to pearl harbor
Response to Japanese invasion of China
-Extend Credit to China
-Restrict exports to Japan
-Ban sale of fuel, scrap iron (the 1940s)
-Freeze Japanese assets in the US (1941)
Pearl Harbor(12/7/41)
Destroy much of US fleet
19 ships sunk/damaged
2200 killed
?Conclusion:
End all debates about whether or not the US should get involved
The US is in war
Why we fight
Goal of films
-Tremendous opportunity to persuade people of the rightness of US
participation in the war
-Primary goal: Teach air forces member about the events that lead US
into the war
Aesthetics of films
-narrated by Walter Huston
-footage from newsreel and other propaganda documentaries
-animation
How does the film contrast the US to the Axis powers
US:
US believes all men are created equal
Axis powers:
-People in Axis powers countries surrender their liberty to minorities.
They gave up their rights. Italian put trust and faith in one man
who planned to betray for the selfish interests of himself
-Constitutional law making bodies gave up their power
-Did away with free speech and free assembly
-Did away with free press and substituted a press controlled by the part.
-Did away free courts and trial by jury.
-Abolish labor unions and rights bargaining for wages
Legalization of Racism
Part I: No-No Boy and Beyond Loyalty
People of japanese descent in US
Issei
First generation of immigrants before 1907 (gentlemen’s agreement)
Nisei
By-birth US citizen (second generation)
Kibei
Part of education in Japan and return to US (born in US)
Beyond Loyalty (Kiyota)
FBI agent
Loyalty questioned by FBI and restricted his ability to leave the camp
Friends/farm manager
Struggling with his own feeling of loyalty
Prevent him from escaping plan
Questionnaire
Refuse to answer a question regarding to loyalty
Family
Seperate him from his family because loyalty problem
Part II: War and the Homefront
Office of war information (OWI)
How to support war effort
-domestic propanganda arm of the federal government to communi
with US people
Use of posters(ask Americans)
-Obey rationing laws
-Economical on consumer habits
-To Recycling
-Planting victory garden, canning their vegetables to restrict amount
of product they need to purchase
-Women were targeted to engage in conscientious responsible ethical
consumerism to ratio to cycle (patriotic duty)
Culture industries and war
Entertainment
Best way to change “hearts and minds”
Create The Bureau of Motion Pictures
Encourage people to behave patriotically
Support war/define war
Create films adress war effort adress war
People’s war between freedom.
Presentation of allies
Present allies in a postivie way
Depiction of Germans
-Present enemies not as entire countries but as ruling leads in their
ideology (German, Italy)
-Should not paint an entire nation in one singular brush and designate
all people from that nation to be mortal enemies
Depiction of Japanese
-Presented as undifferentiated massive people(not individuals)
Not honorable
Comics and the war
Patriotism and comis
Superman urges reader to red cross
Batman and Robin encourages to buy war bond
Images of Japanese in comics
Similarly draw on racist images of Japanese people
Sinister, ugly, subhuman
Racial slur
Part III: Japanese Internment
-no evidence that Japanese or j-a were disloyal of conspiring with
japanede government
Post-Pearl Harbor
Curfew
First thing
Unannounced search in their homes for weapon,radio,cameras and…
Executive Order 9066
-Authorize the army to make particular areas as military areas from
which any civilian could be excluded
-Implemented by Congress in Public law 503
-Legally enable relocation and internment or incarceration of J
Voluntary relocation
At first
Forced relocation
Most people
Relocation
Assembly Centers
Racetracks or fairground run by the army
Relocation Camps
Conditions in Relocation Centers
Hash climates
-ex: dessert, dust storm
Scarce medical care
Lack of privacy
Armed guards, barbed wire
Restriction on movement
Military
Reclassification of Japanese Americans as IV-C
Recruitment of linguists
Reinstitute draft for Japanese-Americans
-refuse -> jail
Loyalty tests
Screening to determine loyalty
Insufficient time to investigate each individual
Disloyal sent to special camps
Loyal released on conditions
-Have offical approveal home, job ,friends
Report address
-Under scrutiny
-Community you going to is not unfavorable
-Disavow loyalty to other countries
Part IV: Responses to Internment
Newspapers
Most stay quiet on the topic or supportive of what happened
ACLU
Groups that protest:Socialist Workers Party; Quakers
Gordon Hirabayashi V United States
Question: curfew and power of national government during time of war
-Did the federal government have the power to impose a curfew
on the specific group of people during the war?
Court: during war “residents having ethnic affiliations with an invading
enemy may be a greater source of danger than those of different
ancestry” (Was there reasonable grounds to believe that the threat was
real and that this remedy was useful?)
It was a remedy
Japanese and Japanese Americans could be imperfectly assimilated
Isolate groups in Japanese community
Their schools could be resources for Japanese propaganda
-Uphold the power of federal government to disrupt the civil liberties
of certain group in the war time for nation security.
Fred Korematsu V United States
Actions to evacuate = constitutional
Can ferderal government evacuate citizens from their homes during
war?
Wartime conditions and hardships
Potentioal disloyal people
limited time to distinguish individual
Dissenting views
Justice Murphy: “accumulation of much of the misinformation,
half-truths and insinuations that for years have been directed against
Japanese Americans by people with racial and economic prejudices”
-Resul …
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