For each script assignment, you will also write a small reflective essay (one to two paragraphs in a Microsoft Word document) in which you will discuss the problem-solving approaches and relevance of the programming concepts used in the script. Collectively, all four small scripts and reflective essays will demonstrate your ability to engage in the fundamental scripting and problem-solving approaches that are represented by the course outcomes: IT-140-01: Apply appropriate data structures to store and manipulate data for solving computational problems IT-140-02: Utilize branches and loops to insert decision points for managing the execution of code IT-140-03: Utilize functions for producing organized, reusable code IT-140-04: Write accurate regular expressions that search for specific patterns in text material IT-140-05: Explain problem solving approaches required for implementing and troubleshooting scripting tasks THERE ARE 4 FINAL SUBMISSIONS; EACH ARE 2-3 PARAGRAPHS. I HAVE ATTACHED THE RUBRIC FOR EACH ONE. ITS PRETTY MUCH THE SAME GUIDELINES FOR EACH SUBMISSION JUST DIFFERENT SCRIPTS. PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THERE IS ANYTHING ELSE YOU MAY NEED AND THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP!
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IT 140 Final Project Script Two Guidelines and Rubric
Overview
Apple cofounder Steve Jobs once said “I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.” Regardless
of your future career path, the programming concepts and the computational thinking practices gained while learning to script will prove useful. In this course, you
will have the opportunity to explore some of the introductory types of scripting and computational thinking that information technology professionals engage in
when they design solutions to social and business problems.
Programming is a both a scientific and creative undertaking. The fundamentals you learn in this course will provide the scientific foundation. Armed with these
skills, you will have the ability to expand the scientific elements to more advanced concepts that can help you solve everyday problems using tools in creative
ways.
For your final project, you will be creating four small scripts. For each script assignment, you will also write a small reflective essay (one to two paragraphs in a
Microsoft Word document) in which you will discuss the problem-solving approaches and relevance of the programming concepts used in the script. Collectively,
all four small scripts and reflective essays will demonstrate your ability to engage in the fundamental scripting and problem-solving approaches that are
represented by the course outcomes:
?
?
?
?
?
IT-140-01: Apply appropriate data structures to store and manipulate data for solving computational problems [BS.ITE.CORE.05]
IT-140-02: Utilize branches and loops to insert decision points for managing the execution of code [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-03: Utilize functions for producing organized, reusable code [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-04: Write accurate regular expressions that search for specific patterns in text material [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-05: Explain problem solving approaches required for implementing and troubleshooting scripting tasks [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
You will have an opportunity to submit a practice draft of each script early in the course and receive feedback from your instructor before you finalize the script and
submit the final version and reflection in a later module. Take advantage of these practice opportunities! Even if your script is not functioning perfectly, submit your
draft and get feedback so that you can improve on it for the final submission. Follow the directions in the practice modules in Codio.
The following table explains when the drafts and final versions of each script are due:
1
IT 140 Final Project
Script Number
Name and Description
Draft Submitted Through Codio
Final Commented Script and
Reflection Due
One
Rental Car Billing Script: This first artifact will
Module Three
address basic data types and decision-making control
structures (branches).
Module Five
Two
Grocery List Script: This second artifact focuses on
Module Four
collection-type data structures (lists and dictionaries)
and iterative loops (for and while).
Module Six
Three
ATM Script: This third artifact addresses developing
functions.
Module Five
Module Seven
Four
Pattern Search and Replace Script: This fourth
artifact involves your use of regular expressions to
search for specific patterns.
Module Six
Module Eight
Part Two: Grocery List Script
Prompt
The list object type is one of the most important and frequently used types in a Python program. A list is a container, an object that groups related objects together.
A list is also a sequence: The contained objects maintain a left-to-right positional ordering. Elements of the list can be accessed via indexing operations that specify
the position of the desired element in the list. Each element in a list can be a different type, such as string, integer, float, or even other list.
A dictionary is another type of container object that is different from sequences like strings, tuples, and lists. Dictionaries contain references to objects as key–
value pairs: Each key in the dictionary is associated with a value, much like each word in an English language dictionary is associated with a definition. Unlike
sequences, the elements of a dictionary do not have a relative ordering of positions. Adding a value to a dictionary can be done either with brackets or using the
keyword dict.
2
A programmer can use loops to execute the same code repeatedly as long as some condition is true. The loop expression is evaluated when the program reaches
the loop statement. If the loop expression is true, then the indented code block, known as the loop body, is executed. At the end of the loop body, execution goes
back to the while loop statement. The loop expression is evaluated again, and if true, the loop body is executed again. But, if the expression evaluates to false, then
execution instead proceeds to code below the loop body. Each execution of the loop body is called an iteration, and looping is also called iterating.
Your task for this project is to create a very simple grocery list script. This script emphasizes the importance of using lists, dictionaries, and loop types within your
script, and how the use of those functions shapes your approach to creating a script.
You will be working on this project in the Project Two: Grocery List Script module in Codio. Following the directions in that module, you will also be able to
determine the exact placement of the comments you will need to make in the code. Follow the directions in the module in Codio to walk through the activity.
Your script and word response for this script should address the following critical elements:
I.
In Your Script (Annotated Text File):
Refer to the directions in the module in Codio for how to export out and comment your completed script.
A. Create examples of four uses of list operations in the script in your code. Be sure your examples address each of the following:
i.
Creating lists
ii.
Adding and removing data from a list
iii.
Accessing values in a list
iv.
Modifying values in a list
B. Create examples of four uses of dictionary operations in your code. Be sure your examples address each of the following:
i.
Creating dictionaries
ii.
Adding and removing key–value pairs
iii.
Accessing values using keys
iv.
Modifying values
C. Create examples of three uses of loop structures in your code. Be sure your examples address each of the following:
i.
Item-based for loops
ii.
Index-based (range) for loops
iii.
While loops
II.
Reflection – Applying Your Experience
Making mistakes when you learn to write code is common. It is part of learning. What is important is developing the skill of learning how to understand
your errors and then fix them (debugging). For this part of your final project, you will respond to the following:
A. Reflecting on your experience with this activity, explain the importance of knowing how and when to use lists, dictionaries, and loop
types. Support your response with examples from the activity of the types of errors and your method for fixing them.
3
Final Project Script Two Rubric
Guidelines for Submission: Your submission should include all annotated text files of code for the script, as well a Microsoft Word document that includes the
reflection part of your assignment in which you explained the problem-solving approaches you employed (critical element II).
Critical
Elements
List
[IT-140-01]
Proficient
Needs Improvement
Creates examples of four uses
of list functions in the script
(100%)
Creates examples of four uses of
list functions in the script, but
uses are inappropriate or
inaccurate (55%)
Does not create examples of
four uses of list functions in
the script (0%)
24
Dictionary
[IT-140-01]
Creates examples of four uses
of dictionary functions (100%)
Creates examples of four uses
of dictionary functions in your
code, but uses are
inappropriate or inaccurate
(55%)
Does not create examples of
four uses of dictionary
functions (0%)
24
Loop
[IT-140-02]
Creates examples of loop
functions (100%)
Creates examples of loop
functions in your code, but
uses are inappropriate or
inaccurate (55%)
Does not create examples of
loop functions (0%)
24
Explains the importance of
knowing how and when to use
lists, dictionaries, and loop
types, and explanation is
supported with example from
the activity about the types of
errors and your method for
fixing them (100%)
Explains the importance of
knowing how and when to use
lists, dictionaries, and loop
types, and explanation is
supported with examples from
the activity about the types of
errors and your method for
fixing them but is illogical,
lacks key details, or is not
specific to lists, dictionaries,
and loop types (55%)
Does not explain the
importance of knowing how
and when to use lists,
dictionaries, and loop types
(0%)
24
Applying Your
Experience
[IT-140-05]
Exemplary
4
Not Evident
Value
Articulation of
Response
Submission is free of errors
related use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and
organization and is presented
in a professional and easy-toread format (100%)
Submission has no major errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization (85%)
Submission has major errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization that negatively
impact readability and
articulation of main ideas
(55%)
Submission has critical errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization that prevent
understanding of ideas (0%)
Total
5
4
100%
IT 140 Final Project Script One Guidelines and Rubric
Overview
Apple cofounder Steve Jobs once said “I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.” Regardless of
your future career path, the programming concepts and the computational thinking practices gained while learning to script will prove useful. In this course, you will
have the opportunity to explore some of the introductory types of scripting and computational thinking that information technology professionals engage in when
they design solutions to social and business problems.
Programming is a both a scientific and creative undertaking. The fundamentals you learn in this course will provide the scientific foundation. Armed with these skills,
you will have the ability to expand the scientific elements to more advanced concepts that can help you solve everyday problems using tools in creative ways.
For your final project, you will be creating four small scripts. For each script assignment, you will also write a small reflective essay (one to two paragraphs in a
Microsoft Word document) in which you will discuss the problem-solving approaches and relevance of the programming concepts used in the script. Collectively, all
four small scripts and reflective essays will demonstrate your ability to engage in the fundamental scripting and problem-solving approaches that are represented by
the course outcomes:
?
?
?
?
?
IT-140-01: Apply appropriate data structures to store and manipulate data for solving computational problems [BS.ITE.CORE.05]
IT-140-02: Utilize branches and loops to insert decision points for managing the execution of code [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-03: Utilize functions for producing organized, reusable code [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-04: Write accurate regular expressions that search for specific patterns in text material [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
IT-140-05: Explain problem solving approaches required for implementing and troubleshooting scripting tasks [BS.ITE.CORE.01]
You will have an opportunity to submit a practice draft of each script early in the course and receive feedback from your instructor before you finalize the script and
submit the final version and reflection in a later module. Take advantage of these practice opportunities! Even if your script is not functioning perfectly, submit your
draft and get feedback so that you can improve on it for the final submission. Follow the directions in the practice modules in Codio.
1
The following table explains when the drafts and final versions of each script are due:
IT 140 Final Project
Script Number Name and Description
Draft Submitted Through Codio
Final Commented Script and
Reflection Due
One
Rental Car Billing Script: This first artifact will
Module Three
address basic data types and decision-making control
structures (branches).
Module Five
Two
Grocery List Script: This second artifact focuses on
Module Four
collection-type data structures (lists and dictionaries)
and iterative loops (for and while).
Module Six
Three
ATM Script: This third artifact addresses developing
functions.
Module Five
Module Seven
Four
Pattern Search and Replace Script: This fourth
artifact involves your use of regular expressions to
search for specific patterns.
Module Six
Module Eight
Script One: Rental Car Billing Script
Prompt
For this script, you will be using variables and branches. A variable is used to remember a value for later use. The statement “age = 15” defines a variable named age,
which Python uses to refer to a new object with the integer value 15. When a statement executes that assigns a value to an existing variable, Python updates the
variable to refer to the newly assigned object. Likewise, reading a variable’s value reads the value of the object referred to by the variable. So, in Python, if you set a
variable to a string, the variable is now a type string object.
To write useful programs, we almost always need the ability to check conditions and change the behavior of the program accordingly. Conditional statements give us
this ability. The simplest form is the if statement. A programmer commonly requires more than one if statement in branches, in which case the elif (short for “else if”)
keyword or else keyword can be used.
Your task for Final Project Script One is to create a simple rental car billing calculator. This script also emphasizes the importance of using and modifying variables,
and how branches may impact your approach in creating a script.
2
You will work on this project in the Project One: Rental Car Billing Script Draft module in Codio. Following the directions in that module, you will also be able to
determine the exact placement of the comments you will need to make in the code. Follow the directions in the module in Codio to walk through the activity.
Specifically, you must address the critical elements listed below. Most of the critical elements align with a particular course outcome (shown in brackets).
I.
In Your Script (Annotated Text File)
Refer to the directions in the module in Codio for how to export out and comment your completed script.
A. Create examples of three uses of variables in the script. Be sure your examples create each of the following fundamental types: [IT-140-01]
i. Assigning a numerical value and string to variables
ii. Changing variable values
iii. Modifying variables with data-type-appropriate operators
B. Create examples of the use of branches and explain using comments in your code. Be sure your code uses the following fundamental statements:
if, elif, and else statements. [IT-140-02]
II.
Reflection – Applying Your Experience
Making mistakes when you learn to write code is common. It is part of learning. What is important is developing the skill of learning how to understand
your errors and then fix them (debugging). For this part of your final project, you will respond to the following:
A. Reflecting on your experience with this activity, explain the importance of knowing how and when to use and modify variables, and using
branches. Support your response with examples from the activity of the types of errors and your method for fixing them. [IT-140-05]
3
Final Project Script One Rubric
Guidelines for Submission: Your submission should include all annotated text files of code for the script, as well a Microsoft Word document that includes the
reflection part of your assignment in which you explained the problem-solving approaches you employed (critical element II).
Critical Elements
Variables
[IT-140-01]
Proficient
Creates three uses and
fundamental types of variables
in code (100%)
Needs Improvement
Creates variables in, but uses
are inappropriate or inaccurate
(55%)
Not Evident
Does not create three uses and
fundamental types of variables
in code (0%)
Value
32
Branches
[IT-140-02]
Creates three uses and
fundamental types of branches
in code (100%)
Creates branches in code, but
uses are inappropriate or
inaccurate (55%)
Does not create three uses and
fundamental types of branches
in code (0%)
32
Applying Your
Experience
[IT-140-05]
Explains the importance of
knowing how and when to use
and modify variables as well as
using branches, and is
supported with examples from
the activity about the types of
errors and your method for
fixing them (100%)
Explains the importance of
knowing how and when to use
and modify variables as well as
using branches, and is
supported with examples from
the activity about the types of
errors and your method for
fixing them, but is illogical, lacks
key details, or is not specific to
using and modifying variables
and branches (55%)
Submission has major errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization that negatively
impact readability and
articulation of main ideas
(55%)
Does not explain the
importance of knowing how
and when to use and modify
variables as well as using
branches (0%)
32
Submission has critical errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization that prevent
understanding of ideas (0%)
4
Articulation of
Response
Exemplary
Submission is free of errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, and
organization and is presented in
a professional and easy-to- read
format (100%)
Submission has no major errors
related to use of citations,
grammar, spelling, syntax, or
organization (85%)
Total
4
100%
IT 140 Final Project Script Four Guidelines and Rubric
Overview:
Apple cofounder Steve Jobs once said “I think everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer because it teaches you how to think.” Regardless
of your future career path, the programming concepts and the computational thinking practices gained while learning to script will prove useful. In this course, you
will have the opportunity to explore some of the introductory types of scripting and computational thinking that information technology professionals engage in
when they design solutions to social and business problems.
Programming is a both a scientific and creative undertaking. The fundamentals you learn in this course will provide the scientific foundation. Armed with these
skills, you will have the ability to expand the scientific elements to more advanced concepts that can help you solve everyday problems using tools in creative ways.
For your final project, you will be creating four small scripts. For each script assignment, you will also write a small reflective essay (one to two paragraphs in a
Microsoft Word document) in which you will discuss the problem-solving approaches and relevance of the programming concepts used in the script. Collectively,
all four small scripts and reflective essays will demonstrate your ability to engage in the fundamental scripting and problem-solving approaches that are
represented by the course outcomes:
?
?
?
?
?
Apply appropriate data structures to store and manipulate data for solving computational problems
Utilize branches and loops to insert decision points for managing the execution of code
Utilize functions for producing organized, reusable code
Write accurate regular expressions that search for specific patterns in text material
Explain problem solving approaches required for implementing and troubleshooting scripting tasks
You will have an opportunity to submit a practice draft of each script early in the cou …
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